ACT English Practice Tests 2

ACT English Practice Tests 2

My Score : 110

Likely to pass
12/07/2021

  • Total Question : 15
  • Answered : 14
075150
110
  • Not likely to pass
  • To close to call
  • Likely to pass

Your Result

  • 1)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #31:

    Your Answer : NO CHANGECorrect Answer : NO CHANGE
  • 2)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #32:

    Your Answer : curious things were keptCorrect Answer : curious things were kept
  • 3)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #33:

    Your Answer : DELETE the underlined portionCorrect Answer : DELETE the underlined portion
  • 4)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #34:

    Your Answer : Not attemptedCorrect Answer : NO CHANGE
  • 5)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #35:

    Your Answer : might have been designedCorrect Answer : might have been designed
  • 6)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    Answer Choices of #36:

    Your Answer : NO CHANGECorrect Answer : as was her life
  • 7)

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    Answer Choices of #37:

    Your Answer : NO CHANGECorrect Answer : DELETE this portion
  • 8)

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    Answer Choices of #38:

    Your Answer : whom she so tenderly lovedCorrect Answer : whom she so tenderly loved
  • 9)

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    Answer Choices of #39:

    Your Answer : NO CHANGECorrect Answer : her grandfather’s love
  • 10)

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    Which choice most effectively concludes the sentence by indicating clearly that how much sadness Nell felt when she saw her grandfather’s declining health due to visible grief?

    Answer Choices of #40:

    Your Answer : at times she felt as though her heart must breakCorrect Answer : at times she felt as though her heart must break
  • 11)

    At last the time came when the old man’s feeble frame could (41)bear up no long against his hidden care. [C] A raging fever seized him, and, as he lay delirious or insensible through many weeks, Nell learned that the house which (42)sheltered them was theirs no longer; that in the future they would be very poor; that they would scarcely have bread to eat. At length the old man began to mend, but his mind was weakened. [D]He would sit for hours together, with Nell’s small hand in his, playing with the fingers, and sometimes stopping to smooth her hair or kiss her brow; and when he saw that tears were glistening in her eyes he would look amazed. As the time drew near when they (43)must left the house, he made no reference to the necessity of finding other shelter. An indistinct idea he had that the child was desolate and in need of help; though he seemed unable to understand their real position more distinctly. But a change came upon him one evening, as he and Nell sat silently together.

    Answer Choices of #41:

    Your Answer : bear up no longerCorrect Answer : bear up no longer
  • 12)

    At last the time came when the old man’s feeble frame could (41)bear up no long against his hidden care. [C] A raging fever seized him, and, as he lay delirious or insensible through many weeks, Nell learned that the house which (42)sheltered them was theirs no longer; that in the future they would be very poor; that they would scarcely have bread to eat. At length the old man began to mend, but his mind was weakened. [D]He would sit for hours together, with Nell’s small hand in his, playing with the fingers, and sometimes stopping to smooth her hair or kiss her brow; and when he saw that tears were glistening in her eyes he would look amazed. As the time drew near when they (43)must left the house, he made no reference to the necessity of finding other shelter. An indistinct idea he had that the child was desolate and in need of help; though he seemed unable to understand their real position more distinctly. But a change came upon him one evening, as he and Nell sat silently together.

    Answer Choices of #42:

    Your Answer : NO CHANGECorrect Answer : NO CHANGE
  • 13)

    At last the time came when the old man’s feeble frame could (41)bear up no long against his hidden care. [C] A raging fever seized him, and, as he lay delirious or insensible through many weeks, Nell learned that the house which (42)sheltered them was theirs no longer; that in the future they would be very poor; that they would scarcely have bread to eat. At length the old man began to mend, but his mind was weakened. [D]He would sit for hours together, with Nell’s small hand in his, playing with the fingers, and sometimes stopping to smooth her hair or kiss her brow; and when he saw that tears were glistening in her eyes he would look amazed. As the time drew near when they (43)must left the house, he made no reference to the necessity of finding other shelter. An indistinct idea he had that the child was desolate and in need of help; though he seemed unable to understand their real position more distinctly. But a change came upon him one evening, as he and Nell sat silently together.

    Answer Choices of #43:

    Your Answer : must leave the houseCorrect Answer : must leave the house
  • 14)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    At last the time came when the old man’s feeble frame could (41)bear up no long against his hidden care. [C] A raging fever seized him, and, as he lay delirious or insensible through many weeks, Nell learned that the house which (42)sheltered them was theirs no longer; that in the future they would be very poor; that they would scarcely have bread to eat. At length the old man began to mend, but his mind was weakened. [D]He would sit for hours together, with Nell’s small hand in his, playing with the fingers, and sometimes stopping to smooth her hair or kiss her brow; and when he saw that tears were glistening in her eyes he would look amazed. As the time drew near when they (43)must left the house, he made no reference to the necessity of finding other shelter. An indistinct idea he had that the child was desolate and in need of help; though he seemed unable to understand their real position more distinctly. But a change came upon him one evening, as he and Nell sat silently together.

    Questions 44 ask about the preceding essay as a whole.

    The writer wants to add the following sentence:

    Nell was overall a happy and cheerful child, who was living in a fantasy world, far away from the harsh realities of life; the home where she lived with her beloved grandfather was an entire world for her.

    The sentence would more logically be placed at Point:

    Your Answer : [B] in paragraph 1Correct Answer : [B] in paragraph 1
  • 15)

    THE house where little Nell and her grandfather (31)lived was one of those places where old and (32)curious things was kept, one of those old houses which seem to crouch in odd corners of the town, and to hide their musty treasures from the public eye in jealousy and distrust. [A] There were suits of mail (33)while they were surely standing like ghosts in armor, (34)here and there; curious carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china, and wood, and iron, and ivory; tapestry, and strange furniture that (35)might have been design in dreams; and in the old, dark, dismal rooms there lived alone together the man and a child—his grandchild, Little Nell. Solitary and dull (36)as were her life, the innocent and cheerful spirit of the child found happiness in all things, and through the dim rooms of the old curiosity shop Little Nell went singing, moving with lightsome step.[B]

    But gradually (37)with the passage of time over the old man, (38)which she so tenderly loved, there stole a sad change. He became thoughtful, sad and wretched. He had no sleep or rest but that which he took by day in his easy-chair; for every night, and all night long, he was away from home. To the child it seemed that (39)her grandfathers love for her increased, even with the hidden grief by which she saw him struck down. And to see him sorrowful, and not to know the cause of his sorrow; to see him growing pale and weak under his trouble of mind, so weighed upon her gentle spirit that (40)at times she felt as she was neglected.

    At last the time came when the old man’s feeble frame could (41)bear up no long against his hidden care. [C] A raging fever seized him, and, as he lay delirious or insensible through many weeks, Nell learned that the house which (42)sheltered them was theirs no longer; that in the future they would be very poor; that they would scarcely have bread to eat. At length the old man began to mend, but his mind was weakened. [D]He would sit for hours together, with Nell’s small hand in his, playing with the fingers, and sometimes stopping to smooth her hair or kiss her brow; and when he saw that tears were glistening in her eyes he would look amazed. As the time drew near when they (43)must left the house, he made no reference to the necessity of finding other shelter. An indistinct idea he had that the child was desolate and in need of help; though he seemed unable to understand their real position more distinctly. But a change came upon him one evening, as he and Nell sat silently together.

    Questions 45 ask about the preceding essay as a whole.

    Which of the following choice most accurately explains the reason behind the sadness of the Nell’s grandfather?

    Your Answer : He knew that soon he had to move out of the house with his granddaughter, and there was no alternative place where they could find shelter.Correct Answer : He knew that soon he had to move out of the house with his granddaughter, and there was no alternative place where they could find shelter.

Skills you can improve

Categorywise score

  • ACT English passage :

    110

    • Total Question : 15
    • Correct Answer : 11