GED Social Studies

GED Social Studies How to Write an Extended Answer Response

GED Social Studies: How To Write An Extended Answer Response[Updated]

The GED Social Studies extended response item has been eliminated on March 1, 2016.

If you’re studying for the GED® Social Studies Exam, you’ve probably been wondering about the Extended Response portion. Today, I’m going to tell you all about it.

In this blog post, you will learn,

    • What to Expect
    • What is Required
    • Grading Scale
    • How to Write an Extended Response Guide

Additional Information

What to Expect

GED Social Studies: How to Write an Extended Answer Response

What is Required

Because this response is expecting you to create an evidence-based writing, there are specific things you should include, like:

  • A well-developed thesis statement
  • 3 pieces of relevant evidence from the material
  • A strong conclusion
  • Well-organized thought process
  • Clear Understanding of Standard English

More review materials HERE

Grading Scale

(This is ©GED®StudyGuide.org’s interpretation of the official GED® Social Studies Extended Response Rubric)

There are three main things you will be graded on:

  • Argument and Use of Evidence
  • Ideas and Organization
  • Understanding of the English Convention

Now, each of the categories above has a possibility of earning 0 to 2 points. To get your score, you add each of the three categorical scores together. You may earn six possible points total.

To help you understand what is expected, I will break down each category, showing you what components they should include:

We have Free GED Social Studies Practice Test

Argument and Use of Evidence

2 POINTS
-You make LOGICAL and SPECIFIC claims about the texts and/or graphics
-You present an accurate analysis of ideas, figures, and events that relate to the information
-You have an accurate analysis of the historical context surrounding the pieces
1 POINT
-You make only ONE claim or implication that is somewhat unclear
-You present a limited analysis of ideas, figures, and events that relate to the information
-You have a limited understanding of the historical context surrounding the pieces
0 POINTS
-You make an illogical claim, or you fail to make a claim at all
-There is a limited analysis of ideas, figures or events that relate to the information, or you there is NO analysis at all
-You appear to have no understanding of the historical context surrounding the pieces

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Ideas and Organization

2 POINTS
-There is logical organization in your response
-There is a clear transition between ideas. Your ideas progress clearly
-Your style, tone, and word choice are appropriate
1 POINT
-Your organization is inconsistent
-Transitions between ideas seem disconnected
-Your style, tone, and word choice are not always appropriate
0 POINTS
-You have no organization
-There are unclear and illogical transitions between topics and ideas
-Your style, tone, and word choice are incorrect and inappropriate

Check our GED® Social Studies Prep Guide

Understanding of Standard English Conventions

2 POINTS
-Your sentence structure is mostly correct
-Your grammar is mostly correct
-You use proper capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
1 POINT
-Your sentence structure is not consistent
-Your grammar has frequent errors
-You have frequent errors in capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
0 POINTS
-There is no control of your sentence structure
-Your grammar is illogical
-You do not properly use capitalization, punctuation and/or spelling

So… then add the points you receive from each category…
If you scored 0 to 3 points, you are considered weak and should improve upon all three traits.
If you scored 4 to 5 points, you need to improve upon one or two of the traits.
If you scored 6 points, your essay is considered a strong response.

Check our GED Social Studies Practice Lessons

How to Write an Extended Response

1. Read the Question Prompt
2. Read the Prompts/Graphs/Charts/Information Provided
3. Create a Thesis Statement
4. Brainstorm
5. Start WRITING!
Make sure to include:

  1. Introduction
  2. Supporting Paragraphs
  3. Conclusion

6.Revise
Your revision checklist should include:

  • Sentence Structure
  • Capitalization
  • Organization of Ideas
  • Transitions between paragraphs
  • Style, Tone and Word Choice
  • Stated Claim
  • Correct Historical Context
  • Analysis of Claim

Related Topics:

Watch our Online GED Math Videos covering all topics you will face during the GED Math test
Citizenship Quiz

GED Social Studies: Citizenship Quiz

If you are part of our free membership, then you received one of our extra study guides!! We hoped that you found it helpful. After reading the email with the Social Studies Guide to Citizenship, please answer the questions below.

Learn more about Free GED Practice Test

1.Juan went for an interview, but was unable to be provide his potential employer with proper citizenship documentation. He would be considered what type of citizen?

    a. Nonresident Alien
    b. Enemy Alien
    c. Refugee
    d. Illegal Alien

2. Janet was born in Japan while her American parents were teaching abroad. Which of the statements is true about her citizenship?

    a. She cannot be considered an American citizen because she was not born on U.S grounds.
    b. She can be considered a citizen only because she was not born in a warring country.
    c. She can be considered a citizen only because both of her parents are America citizens.
    d. She can be considered a citizen because at least one of her parents is an American citizen.

3. Beatrice came to America after fleeing her country during a war period. What type of citizen is she?

    a. Nonresident Alien
    b. Enemy Alien
    c. Refugee
    d. Illegal Alien

4. Which of the following statements are true about Immigrants:

    a. They are coming in to a new country.
    b. They can never gain citizenship in America.
    c. They are always leaving their country because it is at war.
    d. They are returning to their native country.

5. The process to legalize foreigners in America is called:

    a. Emigration
    b. Constituionalization
    c. Naturalization
    d. Residential Certification

6. Alexander is staying with a host family in Texas for one month while he takes a class. Because he has governmental approval and paperwork, he would be considered what type of short-term citizen?

    a. Nonresident Alien
    b. Enemy Alien
    c. Refugee
    d. Illegal Alien

7. Malik is a non-citizen residing i Detroit, Michigan. If his native country declared war on America, what would become of his citizenship status?a.He would be granted citizenship for his protection.

    b. He would become an enemy alien.
    c. He would be deported immediately.
    d. He would become a refugee.

8. What document outlines the rights of American citizens?a. American Pride and Citizenship

    b. U.S Constitution
    c. Citizenship documents
    d. Naturalization Registration

Thanks for taking the quiz, everyone! Below are the answers.
Keep on keeping on! You got this!

1=d; 2=d; 3=c; 4=a; 5=c; 6=a; 7=b; 8=b

We have Free GED Social Studies Practice Test HERE

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GED Social Studies 5 Important People in the Revolutionary You Should Know

GED Social Studies: 5 Important People In the Revolutionary You Should Know

GED Social Studies: 5 Important People in the Revolutionary You Should Know

Let’s talk about the Revolutionary War today. And let’s break this war down by the main players in it.

When we talk about the Revolutionary War, it’s important to recognize that there were two countries or let’s call them “teams”, who are fighting against one another. The first team is the Continental Army. This team is compromised of Americans who have left England and are fighting for their freedom from the Mother Country.  The coach (or the Commander-in-Chiefs of the Continental Army is George Washington, who later became the very first President of the United States.

We have Free GED Social Studies Practice Test HERE

The other team is the Loyalists. These people are just as their name implies: people who are loyal to England. The leader of England at this time is King George III, whose long reign of oppressing the colonists through unfair taxing becomes a catalyst for war.

These two men are the main leaders in the Revolutionary War. But they aren’t doing this thing alone, so let’s talk about three more important players in the Revolutionary War….

3 Important Revolutionary Men GED History

Now, John Adams is important to the Revolutionary War because he was the second President of the United States. He was also an essential mind in creating the Declaration of Independence. But he didn’t write the Declaration of Independence on his own. In fact, Adams just assisted Thomas Jefferson, who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson is known for being the very first Secretary of State, as appointed by George Washington. He then went on to become the third President of the United States of America

The last person in the photo frame above is Benedict Arnold. You should know that Ol’ Ben was a tricky character in the Revolutionary War. He spent the majority of his time as a leader in the Continental Army, but this was actually just a cover-up of his true loyalty. Really, he was a spy for the Loyalists. And when he was discovered, you can imagine the Patriots weren’t too happy with him. In history books, they talk a lot about Arnold by using the word “traitor” and discussing the meaning of “treason”. These are things you can look into if you’re looking for extra information.

Learn more about GED Social Studies Classes Online

Certainly, these players aren’t the only important people from the Revolutionary War, but they are a great launching point as you begin studying this portion of American history.

Have fun as your venture back into the Revolutionary War begins. Try to look at it as a story and not become overwhelmed by dates. And remember, the Continental Army won and now we call ourselves Americans.

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