GRE test scores

GRE Test Scores, Good, Average And Range Of GRE Score

How Is The GRE Test Scored?

There are 3 GRE scores that will be indicated in your score report. One score will show the results of your Quantitative Reasoning (Math) test, another for your Verbal Reasoning test, and then the outcome of your Analytical Writing (Essay) test.

The Score Range for the GRE test is as follows:

Verbal Reasoning 130- 170 pts., in 1 point increments
Quantitative Reasoning 130- 170 pts., in 1 point increments
Analytical Writing 0 – 6 pts., in half-point increments

Each of your scores in these sections is comprised of two components, namely a scaled score and a percentile rank. Your scaled scores may be anything from the score ranges mentioned above while your percentile rank measures how your GRE scores compare to the scores of other test takers. So for example, if your scaled score in the Verbal Reasoning test is 150, it translates to a 47th percentile rank. This means that you have scored better than 47% of all the other GRE test-takers, but worse than the other 53% of the candidates.  You can refer to the most recent GRE percentile ranks for the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing sections released by ETS for further knowledge.

What Is A Good Score For The GRE?

What Is A Good Score For The GRE

What scores in the GRE will have you gaining admission to the graduate school of your choice? A “good” GRE score is basically dependent on the program that you want to enroll in. As of the recent data from ETS, the average score for the totality of GRE test-takers is 150 for the Verbal Reasoning test and 152 for the Quantitative Reasoning test.

The GRE Test is used as a measure for a broad selection of graduate school programs, and its implications are gauged according to the candidates’ chosen fields and from one school to another. You thus have to evaluate how good your GRE scores are in terms of your personal academic goals. Start from the beginning, particularly from your GRE test prep. Primarily be in-the-know about how your GRE scores will be used. The first thing that you should do is to contact the programs that you are considering. Here is a guide to the questions that you may ask:

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  1. What Score Should I Achieve So That I Can Be Accepted?

You need to set a target score that you should work for in your GRE test prep. Your preferred school will most likely quote you a cut-off score, otherwise, you can refer to credible grad school or business school search websites on the Internet to have an idea of the updated average scores of their incoming class.

Related Topic: GRE Test Scores, Good, Average And Range Of GRE Score

  1. Are You Going To Check All The Sections Of My GRE Score?

Some schools may bother about your Math score, but not your Essay score and vice versa. Their requirements should guide you about which subjects you ought to focus on in your test prep.

  1. Will There Be Other Uses For My GRE Score?

Ask if your score will be used for your course placement or particular scholarships. It will greatly benefit you to know this while you have the time to prepare for the test.

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  1. How Important Is My GRE Score In My Application?

It tends to depend on how competitive your target school is when it comes to the significance of your GRE scores. Every number is more inclined to count if your selected program is selective.

  1. How Do You Consider Multiple GRE Scores?

The ScoreSelect option is applicable in the GRE test wherein you get to choose which score to send to your chosen school. Ask your prospective graduate school if they are going to take your highest GRE score. If such is the case, you can loosen up a bit on your first take, knowing that you can take the test again if necessary.

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How Are GRE Scores Used?

How Are GRE Scores Used

GRE scores are used by numerous graduate schools in the United States as part of the admissions process. As a standardized test, the GRE intends to measure the abilities of all graduates pertaining to tasks that are by nature, generally academic. It is meant to assess how undergraduate education has developed the quantitative, verbal and abstract thinking skills of their candidates. Supplementary to GRE scores, graduate schools may also consider other factors such as the candidate’s GPA, letters of recommendation as well as their statements of purpose for admission. The GRE is deemed to be unlike other standardized tests because its use and implications vary from one graduate school to another, from one department to the next and according to its pertinent program.

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