Social Studies Practice Test 1

Social Studies Practice Test 1 – GED Free Online Practice Tests

GED free online practice test for social studies to improve your GED scores. Try our practice questions to prepare for all subjects and pass your GED. Social studies practice test 1 questions are based on latest GED exam that will help you ace your GED. It’s never been late to start preparing for the GED test. So, don’t wait anymore and start with our free practice tests for all subjects.

This practice test covers all the relevant topics of the original GED social studies test. Each question will help you learn and improve your knowledge.

The test is divided into four major categories:
1. Civics and government (50%)
2. US history (20%)
3. Economics (15%)
4. Geography of the world (15%).

 

The official GED social studies test is a single section test. You have 70 minutes to finish the exam. You need to get at least 145 points to pass this test.

Question 1/ GED Social Studies Practice Test




Question 1 of 25 (click ‘Next Page’ at the bottom right of the page to go on to the next question.)

 

4 % Complete

Read the below passage and use it to answer the next 3 questions:
“…As people move, so do microbes. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria together cause 25 percent of all deaths worldwide. With an estimated 40 million people already infected, the national security threat posed by HIV/AIDS is no longer theoretical or prospective; it is clear and present today. It is, moreover, rapidly expanding its deadly reach beyond Sub-Saharan Africa. In the last 5 years, for instance, the HIV/AIDS infection rates in Eastern Europe increased 1300 percent. Even relatively low rates of infection will have enormous consequences for high population countries such as China and India. HIV/AIDS is particularly devastating because it often combines with other infectious diseases””notably tuberculosis””in lethal alliances. To make matters worse, drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis are becoming more prevalent. Such strains can defeat the most sophisticated antibiotics in modern medicine’s arsenal.

The burden of infectious diseases can strain weak health systems to the breaking point and beyond, with pernicious effects on social, economic, and political stability of regions important to America’s interests. The hardest-hit nations in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing precipitous declines in life expectancies, some falling over 30 years. Millions of orphans will need to be raised by the poorest societies on earth; many, forced to fend for themselves or exploited by others, will pose a clear source of instability in affected areas. The spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, therefore, will not only pose a health risk, but threaten to destroy societies, devastate economies, and destabilize entire regions. (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and World Health Organization, AIDS Epidemic Update, December 2001 (Geneva: UNAIDS, 2001); UNICEF, UNAIDS, and WHO, Coordinates 2002: Charting Progress Against AIDS, TB and Malaria (Geneva: World Health Organization, 2002).)

Haass, Richard N. (2007, April 14). Supporting US Foreign Policy in the Post-9/11 World: Policymakers and the Intelligence Community. Retrieved September 27, 2013 by, https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol46no3/article01.html

According to the text, what threatens to destabilize entire regions?

A. Civil war
B. The spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases.
C. Millions of orphans will need to be raised by the poorest societies on earth.
D. Decline of life-expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Question 2/ GED Social Studies Practice Test




Question 2 of 25

 

8 % Complete

Use this same passage to answer the next 2 questions: 1 of 3 questions using this passage complete

“…As people move, so do microbes. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria together cause 25 percent of all deaths worldwide. With an estimated 40 million people already infected, the national security threat posed by HIV/AIDS is no longer theoretical or prospective; it is clear and present today. It is, moreover, rapidly expanding its deadly reach beyond Sub-Saharan Africa. In the last 5 years, for instance, the HIV/AIDS infection rates in Eastern Europe increased 1300 percent. Even relatively low rates of infection will have enormous consequences for high population countries such as China and India. HIV/AIDS is particularly devastating because it often combines with other infectious diseases””notably tuberculosis””in lethal alliances. To make matters worse, drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis are becoming more prevalent. Such strains can defeat the most sophisticated antibiotics in modern medicine’s arsenal.

Try our GED Practice Test for Social Studies 

The burden of infectious diseases can strain weak health systems to the breaking point and beyond, with pernicious effects on social, economic, and political stability of regions important to America’s interests. The hardest-hit nations in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing precipitous declines in life expectancies, some falling over 30 years. Millions of orphans will need to be raised by the poorest societies on earth; many, forced to fend for themselves or exploited by others, will pose a clear source of instability in affected areas. The spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, therefore, will not only pose a health risk, but threaten to destroy societies, devastate economies, and destabilize entire regions. (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and World Health Organization, AIDS Epidemic Update, December 2001 (Geneva: UNAIDS, 2001); UNICEF, UNAIDS, and WHO, Coordinates 2002: Charting Progress Against AIDS, TB and Malaria (Geneva: World Health Organization, 2002).)

Check our GED® Social Studies Prep Guide

Haass, Richard N. (2007, April 14). Supporting US Foreign Policy in the Post-9/11 World: Policymakers and the Intelligence Community. Retrieved September 27, 2013 by, https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol46no3/article01.html

Learn more about GED Social Studies Classes Online

What evidence does the author use to support the idea that microbes move with people with devastating effects?

A. The spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, therefore, will not only pose a health risk, but threaten to destroy societies.
B. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria together cause 25 percent of all deaths worldwide.
C. In the last 5 years, for instance, the HIV/AIDS infection rates in Eastern Europe increased 1300 percent.
D. Both B and C

Related Topics:

Question 3/ GED Social Studies Practice Test




Question 3 of 25

 

12 % Complete

Use this same passage to answer 1 more question: This is the last question using this passage.

“…As people move, so do microbes. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria together cause 25 percent of all deaths worldwide. With an estimated 40 million people already infected, the national security threat posed by HIV/AIDS is no longer theoretical or prospective; it is clear and present today. It is, moreover, rapidly expanding its deadly reach beyond Sub-Saharan Africa. In the last 5 years, for instance, the HIV/AIDS infection rates in Eastern Europe increased 1300 percent. Even relatively low rates of infection will have enormous consequences for high population countries such as China and India. HIV/AIDS is particularly devastating because it often combines with other infectious diseases””notably tuberculosis””in lethal alliances. To make matters worse, drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis are becoming more prevalent. Such strains can defeat the most sophisticated antibiotics in modern medicine’s arsenal.

The burden of infectious diseases can strain weak health systems to the breaking point and beyond, with pernicious effects on social, economic, and political stability of regions important to America’s interests. The hardest-hit nations in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing precipitous declines in life expectancies, some falling over 30 years. Millions of orphans will need to be raised by the poorest societies on earth; many, forced to fend for themselves or exploited by others, will pose a clear source of instability in affected areas. The spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, therefore, will not only pose a health risk, but threaten to destroy societies, devastate economies, and destabilize entire regions. (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and World Health Organization, AIDS Epidemic Update, December 2001 (Geneva: UNAIDS, 2001); UNICEF, UNAIDS, and WHO, Coordinates 2002: Charting Progress Against AIDS, TB and Malaria (Geneva: World Health Organization, 2002).)

Haass, Richard N. (2007, April 14). Supporting US Foreign Policy in the Post-9/11 World: Policymakers and the Intelligence Community. Retrieved September 27, 2013 by, https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol46no3/article01.html

Considering your answers to the above questions, respond briefly on your own: In this case, how does the created environment affect societal development?

A.Tips and Answers below

Question 5/GED Social Studies Practice Test




Question 5 of 25

 

20 % Complete

Please read the article below and then take time to respond to the question.

Both Greece and Rome are Mediterranean countries, but the terrain of the two is very different. The ancient Greek city-states were separated from each other by hilly countryside and all were near the water. Rome was inland, on one side of the Tiber River, but the Italic tribes (in the boot-shaped peninsula that is now Italy) did not have the natural hilly borders to keep them out of Rome. In Italy, around Naples, Mt. Vesuvius produced fertile land by blanketing the soil with tephra which aged into rich soil. There were also two nearby mountain ranges to the north (Alps) and east (Apennine).

By N.S. Gill. Obtained from http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/greecevsrome/ss/GreecevsRome.htm

How were the ancient Greek and Roman countries similar and different? And further, how might natural geography affect, for example, a city on the water versus a city inland?

A. Tips and answers below.